Glass Decoration

Written by Eva Kabelikova

Bohemian glassware is a world icon and remains preserved thanks to the many collections in an array of museums, some of which specialize in exhibitions of glassware. Bohemian glass is produced in the regions of Bohemia and Silesia. It has centuries long history of being internationally recognized for its high quality, craftsmanship, beauty and often innovative designs. Hand-cut, engraved, blown and painted decorative glassware ranging from champagne flutes to enormous chandeliers, ornaments, figurines and other glass items are among the best known Czech exports and immensely popular as tourist souvenirs. The Czech Republic is home to numerous glass studios and schools attended by local and foreign students.

Bohemia, a part of the Czech Republic (formerly part of Czechoslovakia, formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, originally part of Czech Kingdom or Kingdom of Bohemia), became famous for its beautiful and colourful glass during the Renaissance. The history of Bohemian glass started with the abundant natural resources found in the countryside.

Oldest archaeological excavations of glass-making sites date to around 1250 and are located in the Lusatian Mountains of Northern Bohemia. Most notable Czech sites of glass-making throughout the ages are Skalice, Jablonec nad Nisou, Železný Brod, Poděbrady, Karlovy Vary, Kamenický Šenov and Nový Bor. Several of these towns have their own glass museums with many items dating since around 1600.The Museum of Glass and Jewelers in Jablonec nad Nisou is unique in its kind, as is the quality of its collections. They illustrate the evolution of the glass and jeweler industry, various coinages of Czech and foreign origin and have a special focus on the North Bohemian production region. The museum in Kamenicky Senov maps and contrasts glass artwork of the past and present. The exhibition of engraved glass is considered unique.

For more information about the Liberec Region where this place is located click here.